A Hispanic man leaps for joy in a dance studio while his wife smiles on.
Whether your pain is in your shoulder, hand, foot, hip or knee,

we want to help you move again.

We offer unique and comprehensive care designed to maximize and speed up your recovery after your orthopedic procedure.

  • Orthopedic patient navigator and direct contact number
  • Advanced technology including Mako, surgeon-directed robotic arm for hip and knee replacements
  • Guidebook and joint specific education materials to help you feel better prepared
  • Nurses and technicians trained to work with orthopedic patients
  • Individualized physical and occupational therapy on the Texas Health Huguley campus
  • Group therapy activities with other joint replacement patients to maximize mobility and ease you back into normal routine
  • Large, family-friendly private rooms
  • Board-certified orthopedic surgeons on the medical staff at Texas Health Huguley
  • Joint replacement patient reunion dinners to celebrate your success and reconnect with your care team

Contact us at 817-568-5996 to hear more about our program, learn about upcoming educational seminars, or to be scheduled with an Orthopedic Specialist.

Top Ten Things To Do For Arthritis

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1. Get a Proper Diagnosis

Many causes of joint pain are not related to arthritis.  These include fractures, nerve damage (sciatica from back problems), a torn meniscus (knee) bursitis, synovitis, tendonitis, myositis, and even cancer. Always get a proper diagnosis first.

2. Start an Exercise Program

Moderate exercise is an integral part of treating arthritis. Although exercise may sometimes cause discomfort, proper exercise will help nourish the cartilage, strengthen the muscles and may prolong the life of your joints. Check with your doctor before starting any exercise program to obtain permission, precautions or guidelines.

3. Modify Your Activities

Proper body mechanics can lead to a more effective use of your body and less strain on your joints.  Following these activity modification guidelines may prove helpful:

  • Avoid slouching and practice good posture by standing up straight.
  • Avoid sitting in low chairs to reduce stress on your knees when sitting and rising.
  • While traveling, get up and move around every hour or so to avoid stiff joints.
  • Avoid impact-loading activities (running, etc.).
4. Nutritional Supplements

Recently, nutritional supplements have become popular with patients with arthritis. Glucosamine and Chondroitin have been the most widely used.

Glucosamine – This natural building block found in cartilage may also be labeled as a hydrochloride or sulfate. Studies have shown Glucosamine to be useful in strengthening, repairing and revitalizing cartilage, and in reducing pain.

Chondroitin Sulfate – This supplement is commonly taken along with glucosamine. It is found in cartilage and acts like a sponge for the fluid found in cartilage.  This makes the cartilage more elastic and spongy.  Chondroitin may also help prevent the breakdown of cartilage.

Vitamin C and D – Some studies indicate that patients low in Vitamin C and D may have a higher incidence of arthritis. Although a direct cause and effect is not established, it is recommended that arthritis patients take vitamins regularly.

Calcium – Some people confuse osteoporosis with osteoarthritis. Osteoporosis is thinning of the bone, not the joint. Calcium is known to help strengthen the bones and may help prevent the onset of osteoporosis.

Consult with your physician before beginning any new medications.

5. Apply Heat/Cold

Heat and/or cold may be used to decrease pain and increase flexibility. Cold decreases blood flow and helps relieve joint pain and swelling. Heat increases blood flow and helps relax muscles.

HEAT COLD

Use heat prior to exercise -- increases local circulation. Use cold after exercise -- decreases local circulation.

6. Use Orthotics/Bracing/Self-Help Devices/Support

Simple everyday tasks are difficult to accomplish when your joints hurt. Ask your doctor or physical therapist about self-help devices for the feet, knee, hands/wrist or back-hip-knee.

Support – Support devices such as canes, walkers or crutches may also help with pain and discomfort. Talk to your doctor if you feel these might help you with support and balance.

7. Investigate Over-the-Counter Medications

Medications are important in the treatment of arthritis. Many over-the-counter (OTC) medications are effective in patients with arthritis with few side effects.

Pain-relievers such as Tylenol® are generally safe and effective in relieving minor pain and discomfort however, they do not reduce the inflammation caused by arthritis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as Motrin,®Advil® and Aleve® help relieve joint swelling and inflammation.

The American College of Rheumatology recommends Capsaicin cream or gel as part of the treatment plan. Other creams may be found to be useful as well. Always check with your doctor before starting any medication or supplements.

8. Ask About Prescription Medications

When OTC medications are ineffective in reducing the pain, swelling, and stiffness from arthritis, prescription medications may be helpful. There are four general classes of prescription medications:

  • NSAIDS – NSAIDS reduce the production of prostagladins, which is a major cause of pain and swelling in arthritis patients. The drug blocks the COX enzyme, which exists in two forms: COX 1 (good) and COX 2 (bad). Traditional NSAIDS such as Motrin block both of these enzymes.
  • Non-Narcotics – Several drugs, such as Ultram (Tramadol), are usually well tolerated and effective for pain relief. They work by reducing the brain’s recognition of pain. Many other combinations with Tylenol give these drugs a variety of names.
  • Narcotics – Narcotic medication is usually reserved for severe pain of a short duration. These include medications such as Percocet, Lortab and Demerol. They work by reducing brain recognition of pain but have significant side effects such as drowsiness, nausea, constipation and addiction. As most arthritis pain is chronic (longstanding), narcotics are generally not used in people with arthritis.
  • Rheumatoid, Lupus Drugs – There are many excellent medications today for patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory diseases. These complex drugs include Methotrexate, Plaquenil, Remicade, Arava, Enbrel, Prednisone and others. They are used mainly by rheumatologists, internists and family doctors. Your orthopedic surgeon may refer you to one of these specialists for care if you might need one of these medications.
9. Consider Injections Cortisone Injections – Injecting Cortisone directly into joints helps relieve both swelling and pain.

Cortisone is a naturally occurring hormone produced by the adrenal gland that helps for months. The effect occurs usually within a day or two of the injection.

The long-term use of cortisone injections is controversial. Cortisone may play a role in weakening tendons or cartilage if used too often.  Most doctors limit its use to a few times a year depending on the circumstances.

Hyaluronate Injections – Hyaluronate injections have been approved for arthritis of the knee. The injections may help relieve osteoarthritis pain and restore joint function. Hyaluronate is a naturally occurring substance in joint fluid that provides lubrication and cushioning to the joint.

Several synthetic forms of hyaluronate have been developed for use in the knee joint. To be effective, you must receive three to five injections weekly. The effectiveness is usually not noticed for a month or so.

Studies have shown that the more severe the arthritis, the less effective the injections. When effective, however, the relief may last six months to a year. Injections may be repeated in six months.

10. See a Surgeon who specializes in Arthritis.

Surgeons who specialize in arthritis can provide you with all the options and expertise to decide whether surgery is right for you.

Knee Surgery Options

Arthroscopy – Arthroscopy is a form of surgery where surgeons place small instruments through punctures into your knee joint. Damaged tissue can be removed or repaired within the joint providing relief from both pain and swelling while possibly preventing further damage to the knee. This procedure is usually not helpful if you are suffering from severe arthritis.

Total Knee Replacement – For patients with significant arthritis, your surgeon may recommend knee replacement surgery. Knee replacement involves replacing the worn-out surfaces of the knee with metal and plastic components.

Partial Knee Replacement – The knee is composed of three compartments. Osteoarthritis sometimes develops in only one compartment, while the other two remain relatively healthy. Patients who have osteoarthritis in only one compartment may be candidates for a partial knee. The advantage of a partial knee is that it resurfaces only the damaged cartilage of the knee, preserving the undamaged cartilage. You and your surgeon will determine if a partial knee replacement is right for you.

Hip Surgery Options

Hip Replacement – Total hip replacement replaces the ball on the upper end of the femur (thigh bone) and resurfaces the acetabulum (socket). Resurfacing the ball on the upper end of the femur instead of replacing it is sometimes done in younger patients.  These implants are designed to restore function and eliminate as much discomfort as possible while allowing you to return to a more active lifestyle.

Other Forms of Arthritis

Shoulder – Arthritis of the shoulder that results in pain and stiffness may necessitate a shoulder replacement.  The ball end of the shoulder is replaced with a metal ball. The socket may or may not be resurfaced with plastic. The hospital stay is typically one to two days.  Therapy usually continues for three months or more.

Ankle – Arthritis of the ankle can be quite painful. Two options exist. Fusion of the ankle is most common and works well. Occasionally total ankle replacement is performed.

Hands/Wrist/Elbow – These joints can often be treated without surgery. However, in some cases either fusion or replacement is performed.

Total Hip Replacement Procedure

Total hip replacement is a surgical procedure where the worn out surfaces of the hip are replaced with man-made components. Over time, cartilage that cushions the bones can wear away, cause pain and discomfort, and make simple pleasures like walking and shopping unbearable. Hip replacement can reduce or eliminate pain, allow easier movement and get you back to life.

Who is a Candidate for Total Hip Replacement?

Hip replacement surgery may be considered for individuals suffering from arthritic hip pain that severely limits daily activities. It is only recommended after careful examination and diagnosis of your particular joint problem, and only after more conservative measures such as exercise, physical therapy and medications have proven ineffective.

What Kind of Hip Implant is Best?

There are many kinds and designs of hip implants available today, and no one design or type is best for every patient. Surgeons select the implant they believe is best for their patient’s needs based on a number of factors including age, activity level, the implant’s track record, and his or her comfort with the instruments associated with the particular implant. If you have questions regarding implants, your surgeon will be happy to answer them for you.

How Long will I be in the Hospital?

With improvements in surgical techniques and post-op care, it is now common for many patients to be able to go home from the hospital after 1 - 2  days. Of course, each patient is different, but the goal should be for you to recover in the comfort and privacy of your own home as soon as possible.

What are the Risks?

Even though hip replacement surgery is considered a successful procedure, it is major surgery, and as with any surgery, there are risks. Possible complications include:

  • Blood clots in your leg veins
  • Infection
  • Implant loosening
  • Fractures
  • Nerve or blood vessel damage
  • Hip dislocation
  • Change of leg length

Your surgeon and healthcare team will take great care to minimize the risk of these and other complications. Keep in mind that complications are rare, but they need to be understood by you and your family. Your surgeon will be happy to answer any questions.

How Successful is Hip Replacement?

Total hip replacement is recognized as one of the most successful procedures in all of medicine. In the United States, over 300,000 people have their hips replaced in the United States each year.

How Long is the Recovery Period?

Recovery can vary from person to person, but many people will need to use an ambulation aid such as a walker for 1-2 weeks. You may have restriction of some hip motions for 1 month. Driving may be possible in 1-2 weeks, and activities such as golf and bowling can be resumed in as few as 10 - 12 weeks. 

Total Knee Replacement Procedure

Total knee replacement is a surgical procedure where the worn out surfaces of the knee are resurfaced with metal and plastic components.  Over time, the cartilage that cushions the bones can wear away, cause pain and discomfort, and make simple pleasures like walking and shopping unbearable. Knee replacement can reduce or eliminate pain, allow easier movement and get you back to normal life.

Who is a Candidate?

Knee replacement surgery may be considered for those suffering from arthritic knee pain that severely limits the activities of daily living. It is only recommended after careful examination and diagnosis of your particular joint problem, and only after more conservative measures such as exercise, physical therapy, and medications have proven to be ineffective.

What Kind of Knee Implant is Best?

There are many kinds and designs of knee implants available today, and no one design or type is best for every patient. Surgeons select the implant they believe is best for their patient’s needs based on a number of factors including age, activity level, the implant’s track record, and his or her comfort with the instruments associated with the particular implant. If you have specific questions regarding implants, your surgeon will be happy to answer them.

How Long will I be in the Hospital?

With improvements in surgical techniques and post-op care, it is now common for many patients to be able to go home from the hospital after 1 - 2 days. If you have both knees replaced at the same time, the stay can be a day or two longer. Of course, each patient is different, but the goal should be for you to recover in the comfort and privacy of your own home as soon as possible.

How Long is the Recovery Period?

Recovery can vary from person to person, but many people will need to use an ambulation aid such as a walker for 2 - 4 weeks or so. Driving may be possible in 2 - 4 weeks, and activities such as golf and bowling can be resumed in as few as 10 - 12 weeks. Some activities such as singles tennis and skiing are not recommended after knee replacement.

Most people will be in the hospital two or three days, though some patients, particularly those who live alone, may need to spend a few days at a rehabilitation center or nursing home.

How Successful is Knee Replacement?

Total knee replacement is recognized as one of the most successful procedures in all of medicine. In the United States, over 600,000 knee replacements are performed each year. Most patients opting for a total knee replacement found improvement in pain, functional status and an overall quality of life.

What are the Risks?

Even though knee replacement surgery is considered a successful procedure, it is major surgery, and as with any surgery, there are risks. Possible complications include:

  • Blood clots in your leg veins
  • Infection
  • Implant loosening
  • Fractures
  • Nerve or blood vessel damage
  • Knee stiffness

Surgery Timeline

  • 4 to 6 weeks out.  Schedule surgery.  You’ll be given a Pre-op scheduling form and a Patient Guidebook for hip or for knee that will help pre-operative and post-operatively
  • Encourage family participation by selecting a “Coach” from friends or family.  Your coach will attend the pre-op class and visit throughout stay and attend group classes.
  • 3 to 4 weeks out.  Attend a pre-operative class taught by the Joint Care Coordinator in your Surgeon’s Office.
  • 2 to 3 weeks out.  Obtain clearance from Primary Care Physician or Specialist if requested by Surgeon.
  • 10 to 14 days prior.  Pre-testing completed.
  • Day of surgery.  Our specially trained staff will help you get back on your feet the same day.
  • 1 to 2 days after surgery.  Therapy will cater to your specific needs to help you recover more quickly and maximize potential.  Group Therapy and activities ease you back into your return to function
  • Discharge home.
  • 2 to 4 weeks after surgery.  Continue physical therapy in the outpatient or home health setting.

Sports Medicine

Whether you enjoy sports in your leisure time or you are a competitive athlete, we understand that you want to stay in the game. If you are experiencing symptoms that limit your normal level of activity, a visit with a physician may be the first step toward getting you off the sidelines.

The sports medicine team at Texas Health Huguley is equipped for the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of injuries related to sports and exercise:

  • Our radiology services department’s modern equipment provides clear images for accurate diagnoses.
  • Our licensed physical therapists have specialized training and experience to perform comprehensive evaluations and develop customized treatment programs. A low patient-to-therapist ratio ensures a hands-on approach to treatment with individualized care. 
  • When it’s time for treatment and rehab, our outpatient therapy department includes a spacious rehab gym, a variety of resistance and cardio equipment, indoor lap and therapy pools, and the use of the 55,000-square-foot Texas Health Huguley Fitness Center.

If you or a loved one are dealing with a sports-related injury, learn about your available treatment options by calling Call817-568-5996.